Connecting with People review

Academic collaborators who provided peer review during the development of the clinical tools and final shaping of the content of the Connecting with People training:

  • Professor Linda Gask - Professor of Primary Care Psychiatry, University of Manchester
  • Dr Gill Green - STORM Project Manager, University of Manchester
  • Professor Paul Gilbert – Creator of compassionate mind approach, Consultant Clinical Psychologist, Derbyshire Health Care NHS Foundation Trust.
  • Professor Stephen Platt - Professor of Health Policy Research, Centre for Population Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Samaritans Trustee
  • Professor Carolyn Chew Graham - RCGP Clinical Champion Mental Health, Professor of Primary Care, University of Manchester, GP NHS Manchester
  • Dr Mick Dennis - Reader in Liaison Psychiatry, University of Swansea
  • Dr Joanne Reeve - Senior Lecturer and GP, University of Liverpool
  • Dr Chris Manning – Lead Mental Health Advisory Board, College of Medicine, Founder of Upstream Health Care, Chief Executive of Primhe (Primary Care mental health and education)
  • Martin Seager - Founder of National Advisory Group on Mental Health, Safety and Well-Being
  • Sofia Wadman – Cariad yn Cyfri
  • Dr Robin and Meredith Youngson, Founders HEARTSinHEALTHCARE

 

Clinical Tools

Module 1Module 2Module 3Module 4
Suicide AwarenessSuicide Response Part 1Suicide Response Part 2Self Harm Awareness
  • Questions to ask
  • CK Classification
  • Risk Factors and warning signs
  • Feeling on the edge
  • Questions to ask
  • CK Continuum
  • CK Classification
  • Risk Factors and warning signs
  • CK Mitigation Framework
  • CK Bank of Hope
  • Co-creating a safety plan
  • Feeling on the edge
  • CK/W Self Harm Mitigation Framework
  • Harm minimisation & safety plan
  • Feeling on the edge

Questions to ask

Pragmatic peer reviewed (BMJ Masterclass handbook 2012) list of questions to gently but thoroughly assess a patient who might be experiencing suicidal thoughts. Questions also reviewed by patients, their carers and people with lived experience of suicidal thoughts. Designed to use non stigmatising language and promote a compassionate approach with open ended questions followed by specific closed questions to fully assess the degree of someone’s suicidal thoughts and plans.

C-K Classification

This peer reviewed and published resource (BMJ Masterclass handbook 2012) was developed with the aim of creating a common language and understanding between patients and practitioners. It creates a common language to aid understanding and compliments a clinical assessment to assist with both the triage and referral of a distressed and potentially suicidal individual to enhance patient care. assessment tool for clinicians Its development was also to encourage a common culture and consistency of approach. Using a standardised language permits greater clarity, accuracy and consistency of practice over time and across patient groups. Communication is improved between those people experiencing suicidal thoughts and those working to help them, including healthcare professionals, their carers and the third (voluntary) sector.

C-K Continuum

The CK Continuum was developed to demystify the process of assessing someone with suicidal thoughts. It is an index of all the aspects of suicidal thoughts that need to be teased out to ensure a thorough assessment and will support a complex primary care or specialist assessment of a patient with suicidal thoughts. It has been laid out in a systematic, structured way so that the type of questions asked first, are the least stressful which make them easier for a patients to answer. This will help develop trust and provide confidence to the assessor. The more we understand about the nature of suicidal thoughts, the more we will be able to empower patients not to act on them. The CK Continuum was developed as an educational tool, to support clinical assessments and for patients and carers to identify their ‘Crisis signature’.

C-K Mitigation Framework

This peer reviewed and published resource was developed to demystify the process of identifying and responding to suicide risk in a transparent, collaborative and therapeutic way. It is based on Structured Professional Judgement to identify evidenced based suicide risk factors in four domains:

  1. Demographic and social
  2. Personal background
  3. Clinical factors in history
  4. Mental State Examination, particularly suicidal thoughts

The identified risk factors are then considered for both immediate and longer term interventions in biological, psychological and social domains to mitigate all identified risks. Its uses may include as an educational tool, to support clinical assessments and to increase patients’ and carers’ identification and understanding of suicidal thoughts and thoughts of self harm. It may assist them in engaging in a collaborative creation of a ‘safety plan’ with their practitioners and enable them to participate more fully in identifying and dealing with their suicidal thoughts.

C-K Bank of Hope

This peer reviewed and published resource was designed to instill hope and decrease the potency and distress of suicidal thoughts or thoughts of self harm. The Bank of Hope is a set of simple coping strategies designed to promote resilience and to decrease the seriousness of distress felt by individuals in emotional and physical pain. The strategies are designed to instil hope, enhance the self-efficacy and internal locus of control of a suicidal person, and to reduce the potency of suicidal thoughts and the likelihood of acting on these thoughts. The techniques are simple enough to be used by distressed suicidal individuals whose ability to cope with new information can be impaired at times of crisis. Its user friendly design makes it suitable for suicidal individuals themselves and all types of carers (statutory and voluntary), including unqualified staff e.g. support workers and those with no specific psychiatric training.

Creating a Safety Plan

This peer reviewed and published clinical resource outlines the way that practitioners can compassionately engage with and collaborate with patients to explore reasons for living, develop strategies to help stay safe, and establish a network of support (carers can assist if appropriate).

Risk Factors and warning signs

This peer reviewed and published resource is a practitioner friendly table containing a summary of all the evidenced based risk factors for suicide. It has recently been updated and republished with permission in the BMJ Masterclass handbook. The current version also includes warning signs to assist assessors in identifying a ‘Red Flag’ situation when a person may be at imminent risk of suicidal behaviour.

Feeling on the edge resource

RCPsych Resource intended to instil hope in, and compassionately engage with, people who attend the Emergency Department following self harm or with suicidal thoughts

  • To encourage them to stay in hospital to complete their healthcare journey
  • Explains the help that different support organisations can provide

Designed to be handed to patients who attend the Emergency Department following self harm or with suicidal thoughts but also very useful for distressed people at any stage of their healthcare journey.

Cole-King & Wadman Self Harm Mitigation Framework

This peer reviewed and published resource was developed to demystify the process of identifying and responding to young people who engage in self harm in a transparent, collaborative and therapeutic way. It is based on Structured Professional Judgement to identify evidenced based suicide risk factors in four domains:

  1. Demographic and social
  2. Personal background
  3. Clinical factors in history
  4. Mental State Examination, particularly thoughts of self harm

The identified risk factors are then considered for both immediate and longer term interventions in biological, psychological and social domains to mitigate all identified risks. Its uses may include as an educational tool, to support clinical assessments and to increase patients’ and carers’ identification and understanding of self harm. It may assist them in engaging in a collaborative creation of a ‘safety plan’ with their practitioners and enable them to participate more fully in identifying and dealing with their self -harm.